Eversole Laryngoscope

WLMD ID: amae
The Foregger Company first produced this laryngoscope in the 1940s, after a design request from anesthesiologist Urban H. Eversole, M.D. (1906-1985). It is a modification of the Jackson Laryngoscope introduced during the first decade of the 20th century. Like the Jackson Laryngoscope, the Eversole Laryngoscope featured an ‘L-shaped’ handle. As well, part of the 'floor' of the blade could be turned to open the flange, or it could be removed completely. In 1952 a “hook-on” Eversole Blade became available. The hook-on blade had a fixed flange, rather than a rotating/removable flange.

Anesthesiologists use laryngoscopes to lift the tongue and tissue in the throat to expose the vocal cords and see the opening to the windpipe. This allows for the safe insertion of an endotracheal (breathing) tube, which carries air and anesthetic gases to the patient's lungs.

In 1933, Dr. Eversole joined the staff at The Lahey Clinic, in Boston. He worked there with fellow anesthesiologists Lincoln F. Sise, M.D. (1874-1942), and Philip D. Woodbridge, M.D. (1895-1978). Dr. Eversole remained at the Lahey Clinic for 40 years. For 25 of those he was chair of the anesthesia department. He wrote over 100 articles during his career and was active in many professional organizations. These included the American Society of Anesthesiologists, for which he served as president in 1951.

Catalog Record: Eversole Laryngoscope

Access Key: amae

Accession No.: 1982-11-19-1

Title: Eversole [laryngoscope] / Foregger.

Author: Eversole, Urban H. (Harris), 1906-1985.
Corporate Author: Foregger Company.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Eversole laryngoscope blade.

Publisher: New York: Foregger, [between 1943 and 1961?].

Physical Descript: 1 laryngoscope : metals, glass ; 14 x 2.5 x 17.5 cm.

Subject: Laryngoscopes – straight blades.
Subject: Airway Management – instrumentation.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Eversole, Urban H. (Harris), 1906-1985.

Note Type: General
Notes: The early year in the date range for the possible year of manufacture of this
laryngoscope is based on the first year that the Eversole Laryngoscope is
found in the Foregger catalog (1949) and the date of the preceding catalog
(1942). The end year is based on the year of publication of the last catalog
in which the Eversole Laryngoscope with a two-piece blade was found (1959) as
well as the following catalog (1962) in which the blade appears to be one
piece. While the caption for the Eversole Laryngoscope in the 1949 catalog
states, ” … with revolving sleeve in the blade opened for intubation.,” the
catalogs from 1952-1959 do not state this. Only the illustration of the blade
seems to indicate that the blade is still two-pieces. The caption in these
catalogs reads, “Design of Dr. Urban H. Eversole. An anesthetist’s
modification of the original Chevalier Jackson scope. Made only in one size.
Used at Lahey Clinic.” The date range could change if documentation, or
expert opinion, indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: General
Notes: The title was constructed from markings on the laryngoscope handle and text
in the 1949 Foregger catalog describing the laryngoscope.

Note Type: With
Notes: The laryngoscope is stored in a velvet lined wooden box. The box measures
approximately 4.7 x 19.8 x 17.2 cm in height x width x depth. The box is
molded to cradle the laryngoscope. In the center are two molded spaces for
batteries, and a space for a spare bulb. Batteries are not present but a
spare bulb is. The box is hinged and has a metal clasp to hold it closed.
There are no markings on the box.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: We salute Urban H. Eversole, M.D. Anesth Analg. 1962;41(4):421.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Catalog No. 8. New York: The Foregger Company, Inc.; 1942.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Catalog No. 9. New York: The Foregger Company, Inc.; 1949:103.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Catalog No. 10. New York: The Foregger Company, Inc.; 1952:122.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Anesthesia Apparatus. Roslyn Heights, N.Y.: Foregger Co. Inc.; 1962:44.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One “U” shaped laryngoscope; This description and the measurements are based
on a patient’s perspective; The ‘floor’ of the blade can turned to open the
flange, or it can be removed completely; The light bulb is near the proximal
end of the blade; The diameter of the handle seems to be made for AA
batteries ; The surface of the vertical and horizonal portions of the handle
are knurled; Stamped near the end of the handle is the following text,
“EVERSOLE [new line] LAHEY CLINIC [new line] FOREGGER [new line] NEW YORK”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed for the WLM by Mr. Steve Donisch, January 2015.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Joseph M. Dondanville, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: The Foregger Company first produced this laryngoscope in the 1940s, after a design request from anesthesiologist Urban H. Eversole, M.D. (1906-1985). It is a modification of the Jackson Laryngoscope introduced during the first decade of the 20th century. Like the Jackson Laryngoscope, the Eversole Laryngoscope featured an ‘L-shaped’ handle. As well, part of the ‘floor’ of the blade could be turned to open the flange, or it could be removed completely. In 1952 a “hook-on” Eversole Blade became available. The hook-on blade had a fixed flange, rather than a rotating/removable flange.

Anesthesiologists use laryngoscopes to lift the tongue and tissue in the throat to expose the vocal cords and see the opening to the windpipe. This allows for the safe insertion of an endotracheal (breathing) tube, which carries air and anesthetic gases to the patient’s lungs.

In 1933, Dr. Eversole joined the staff at The Lahey Clinic, in Boston. He worked there with fellow anesthesiologists Lincoln F. Sise, M.D. (1874-1942), and Philip D. Woodbridge, M.D. (1895-1978). Dr. Eversole remained at the Lahey Clinic for 40 years. For 25 of those he was chair of the anesthesia department. He wrote over 100 articles during his career and was active in many professional organizations. This included the American Society of Anesthesiologists, for which he served as president in 1951.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Selected for the WLM website (noted April, 2015).