Magill Nasal Tubes

WLMD ID: akvu, akvv, akvw, akvx, akvy
The British anesthesiologist, Sir Ivan W. Magill (1888-1986) served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during WWI, and in 1919 he was posted at Queen’s Hospital for Facial and Jaw Injuries. There, Magill and his colleague, Dr. Stanley Rowbotham (1890-1979) developed new methods needed for these difficult cases of plastic surgery. Traditional breathing tubes placed in the mouth were impractical. The latest anesthesia apparatus used forced air (insufflation), which was also undesirable for these surgeries. Their technique of blind intubation (placing a breathing tube through the nose into the larynx without the aid of a laryngoscope) called for new equipment. Magill introduced his intubating forceps in 1920, and his new nasal tubes in 1921; both are still in use today. Their success is due in no small part to the fact that he persuaded manufacturers to make the tubes in a range of sizes that had not been available before. He is credited with advancing endotracheal anesthesia to its present importance, in part through his many inventions. Dr. Magill’s expertise, and his active leadership in the specialty, earned him numerous honors. He was knighted for his services to the Royal Family in 1946.

Catalog Record: Magill Nasal Tubes

Five Catalog Records: akvu, akvv, akvw, akvx and akvy
Historical Note in the First Record Only (akvu)

Access Key: akvu

Title: Magill oral [endotracheal tube] / [designed by Ivan W. Magill].

Author: Magill, Ivan W. (Whiteside), 1888-1986.

Publisher: England : A.C. King, [between 1945 and 1975?].

Physical Descript: 1 endotracheal tube : rubber ; 3.5 x 1 x 21 cm.

Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Airways.
Subject: Insufflation – instrumentation.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Anesthesia, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Magill, Ivan Whiteside, Sir, 1888-1986.

Note Type: General
Notes: Date early date, in the date range for the possible year of manufacture for
the tube described here, is based on reports that A. Charles King Ltd. helped
Magill manufacture tubes after World War II. The later year (1975) for the
possible year of manufacture is a rough estimate based on the year that
British Oxygen Company ran a rebranding campaign, changing its name and logo.
This tube has the logo that dates before 1975 (Adeney , 2010). The date range
could change if documentation indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Adeney M. Smith, Sir Leslie Edward George (1919–2006). Oxford Dictionary of
National Biography website. https://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.
jsp?articleid=97324&back=&version=2010-01#. Published January, 2010. Accessed
September 18, 2013.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ball CM. The evolution of the rubber endotracheal tube. Anaesth Intensive
Care. 2014;42(4):435-436.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Bowes JB, Zorab JSM. Sir Ivan Magill’s contribution to anaesthesia. In:
Rupreht J, van Lieburg MJ, Lee JA, Erdmann W, eds. Anaesthesia: Essays on Its
History. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1982:13-17.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Drury PME. Anaesthesia in the 1920s. Br J Anaesth. 1998;80(1):96-103.
https://bja.oxfordjournals.org/content/80/1/96.full.pdf. Accessed February 3,
2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Hagberg CA, Ghouse AA, Iannucci DG. The development of techniques for airway
management. In: Eger EI III, Saidman LJ, Westhorpe RN, eds. The Wondrous
Story of Anesthesia. New York: Springer; 2014:733-734.

Note Type: Not Applicable
Notes: Magill IW. Endotracheal anaesthesia. Proc R Soc Med. December,
1928;22(2):84-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/154880/. Accessed
February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. The provision for expiration in endotracheal insufflation
anaesthesia. Lancet. 1923;202(5211):68-69.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW, Macintosh RR, Hewer CL, Nosworthy MD, McConnell WS. Lest we
forget: an historic meeting of the section of anaesthetics of Royal Society
of Medicine on 6 December 1974. Anaesthesia. 1975;30(4):476-490.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Maltby JR. Magill Forceps: Sir Ivan Whiteside Magill (1888-1986). In: Notable
Names in Anaesthesia. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press, Limited;
2002:123-125.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: McLachlan G. Sir Ivan Magill KCVO, DSc, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, FFARCS (Hon),
FFARCSI (Hon), DA, (1888-1986). Ulster Med J. 2008;77(3):146–152. https://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2604469/. Accessed January 30, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Rowbotham ES, Magill I. Anaesthetics in the plastic surgery of the face and
jaws. Proc R Soc Med. 1921;14(sect anaesth): 17-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC2152821/. Accessed February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Wilkinson DJ. A. Charles King: a unique contribution to anaesthesia. J Roy
Soc Med. 1987;80(8): 510–514.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One red rubber tube; When measured from the patient perspective, with the
tube in its natural resting state, it is approximately 3.3 cm in height; This
height is formed by the curve of the tube; The tube is approximately .6 cm
wide (this is the external diameter of the tube), and approximately 20.7 cm
in depth (this might also be called the length of the tube); When the tube is
measured along the cure rather than from end to end, it measures
approximately 21.5 cm deep (or in length); The rubber is in good condition
and still has some elasticity; The proximal end is beveled (or cut at an
angle), while the distal end is blunt (or cut horizontally); Manufacturer
markings on the tube include, “MAGILL ORAL [new line] A. C. KING [new line]
MADE IN ENGLAND”; To the left of this text is the logo for the British Oxygen
Company: “BOC” in a circle with “O” overlapping “B” and “C”; To the right of
the text with the name and manufacture information is the tube size, printed
as, “1.0 [new line] MM”, in a circle; To the right of the tube size are three
different groups of markings: “37013”, HHTS”, and “B.S. 3487”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, September, 2013.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Magill’s rubber endotracheal tube was born from years of persistent and
innovative problem solving by British anaesthetist, Ivan Whiteside Magill
(1888-1986). The tubes came with a natural curve, a soft beveled end, and in
a number of sizes and lengths for intubation via the mouth or nose.

Dr. Magill, a surgeon, had administered anesthesia for a modest number of
surgeries when, after World War I, he took on the position of anesthetist at
the Queen’s Hospital for Facial and Jaw Injuries in London. There he and
fellow anaesthetist, Stanley Rowbotham, were faced with the challenge of
administering anesthesia and maintaining a patent airway for patients having
cutting-edge plastic surgery for severe injuries and malformations of the
face, including the nose and mouth.

Prior to Magill and Rowbotham’s arrival at Queen’s Hospital, the anesthesia
of choice was the oil-ether enema. It was easy to administer and kept
anesthesia equipment off the face and thus out of the surgeons’ way. However,
oil-ether enema anesthesia had significant drawbacks. The anaesthetist had
little control over the depth of anesthesia, and maintaining a patent airway
was still problematic. Likewise, it was not unusual for the patient to
require 24 hours to fully recover from an oil-ether enema.

Drs. Magill and Rowbotham began using a method called intratracheal
insufflation. This involved passing a tube through the mouth into the trachea
(the main windpipe of the lungs). Anesthetic gas mixtures and air were
continuously blown through the tube by a motorized pump. Expired air exited
around the tube and out the nose and mouth. By 1920, Magill and Rowbotham had
developed nasotracheal intubation, a technique for inserting the tube through
the nose and then into the trachea. This allowed the anaesthetist to keep the
tube out of the mouth for surgeries in and around the mouth.

Occasionally the pathway for expired air would become obstructed due to the
nature of the surgery, secretions, bleeding or swelling. Also, because the
surgeon was working on the face, the surgeon was exposed to the expired
breathe of the patient, including ether fumes and sprays of blood and
secretions. In 1922, Dr. Magill began inserting a second tube into the
trachea to provide a patent pathway for expired gases to escape and be
directed away from the surgeon.

In a 1921 publication, Magill and Rowbotham briefly referred to the use of a
single large bore catheter, and in 1928 Magill provided more detail on the
use of a single tube for “to-and-fro” breathing. Rather than a continuous
flow of anesthetic gas mixtures, gas was administered through a larger tube
only during inspiration, so that expiration could take place through the same
tube. The year 1928 was a significant one in endotracheal anesthesia. Magill
also first described his now well-known technique of blind nasal intubation,
and Drs. Arthur E. Guedel and Ralph M. Waters introduced their cuffed
endotracheal tube.

Later in his career, Dr. Magill described the difficulties he encountered in
obtaining tubes with his design requirements. Eventually he found a rubber
shop that would supply him with the tail ends of rubber tubing that was
stored in coils. He found that the natural curve of this tubing aided
intubation. Magill would take a piece of the curved tube, cut an oblique
angle at the tracheal end, and smooth it with emery paper. During World War
II the rubber shop was destroyed by a bomb, but after the war the
manufacturer Charles King helped Magill get tubes manufactured to his
specifications.

Access Key: akvv

Title: Magill nasal [endotracheal tube] / [designed by Ivan W. Magill].
Author: Magill, Ivan W. (Whiteside), 1888-1986.

Publisher: England : A.C. King, [between 1945 and 1975?].

Physical Descript: 1 endotracheal tube : rubber ; 7.5 x 1 x 22.5 cm.

Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Airways.
Subject: Insufflation – instrumentation.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Anesthesia, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Magill, Ivan Whiteside, Sir, 1888-1986.

Note Type: General
Notes: Date early date, in the date range for the possible year of manufacture for
the tube described here, is based on reports that A. Charles King Ltd. helped
Magill manufacture tubes after World War II. The later year (1975) for the
possible year of manufacture is a rough estimate based on the year that
British Oxygen Company ran a rebranding campaign, changing its name and logo.
This tube has the logo that dates before 1975 (Adeney , 2010). The date range
could change if documentation indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Adeney M. Smith, Sir Leslie Edward George (1919–2006). Oxford Dictionary of
National Biography website. https://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.
jsp?articleid=97324&back=&version=2010-01#. Published January, 2010. Accessed
September 18, 2013.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ball CM. The evolution of the rubber endotracheal tube. Anaesth Intensive
Care. 2014;42(4):435-436.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Bowes JB, Zorab JSM. Sir Ivan Magill’s contribution to anaesthesia. In:
Rupreht J, van Lieburg MJ, Lee JA, Erdmann W, eds. Anaesthesia: Essays on Its
History. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1982:13-17.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Drury PME. Anaesthesia in the 1920s. Br J Anaesth. 1998;80(1):96-103.
https://bja.oxfordjournals.org/content/80/1/96.full.pdf. Accessed February 3,
2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Hagberg CA, Ghouse AA, Iannucci DG. The development of techniques for airway
management. In: Eger EI III, Saidman LJ, Westhorpe RN, eds. The Wondrous
Story of Anesthesia. New York: Springer; 2014:733-734.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. Endotracheal anaesthesia. Proc R Soc Med. December,
1928;22(2):84-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/154880/. Accessed
February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. The provision for expiration in endotracheal insufflation
anaesthesia. Lancet. 1923;202(5211):68-69.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW, Macintosh RR, Hewer CL, Nosworthy MD, McConnell WS. Lest we
forget: an historic meeting of the section of anaesthetics of Royal Society
of Medicine on 6 December 1974. Anaesthesia. 1975;30(4):476-490.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Maltby JR. Magill Forceps: Sir Ivan Whiteside Magill (1888-1986). In: Notable
Names in Anaesthesia. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press, Limited;
2002:123-125.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: McLachlan G. Sir Ivan Magill KCVO, DSc, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, FFARCS (Hon),
FFARCSI (Hon), DA, (1888-1986). Ulster Med J. 2008;77(3):146–152. https://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2604469/. Accessed January 30, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Rowbotham ES, Magill I. Anaesthetics in the plastic surgery of the face and
jaws. Proc R Soc Med. 1921;14(sect anaesth): 17-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC2152821/. Accessed February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Wilkinson DJ. A. Charles King: a unique contribution to anaesthesia. J Roy
Soc Med. 1987;80(8): 510–514.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One red rubber tube; When measured from the patient perspective, with the
tube in its natural resting state, it is approximately 8.7 cm in height; This
height is formed by the curve of the tube; The tube is approximately .9 cm
wide (this is the external diameter of the tube), and approximately 22.5 cm
in depth (this might also be called the length of the tube); When the tube is
measured along the cure rather than from end to end, it measures
approximately 27.6 cm deep (or in length); The rubber is in good condition
and still has some elasticity; The proximal end is beveled (or cut at an
angle), while the distal end is blunt (or cut horizontally); Manufacturer
markings on the tube include, “MAGILL NASAL [new line] A. C. KING [new line]
MADE IN ENGLAND”; To the left of this text is the logo for the British Oxygen
Company: “BOC” in a circle with “O” overlapping “B” and “C”; To the right of
the text with the name and manufacture information is the tube size, printed
as, “6.5 [new line] MM”, in a circle; To the right of the tube size are three
different groups of markings: “37003”, STS”, and “B.S. 3487”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, September, 2013.

Access Key: akvw

Title: Magill endotracheal tube : no. 7 nasal / [designed by Ivan W. Magill].
Author: Magill, Ivan W. (Whiteside), 1888-1986.

Publisher: England : A. Charles King Ltd., [between 1945 and 1975?].

Physical Descript: 1 endotracheal tube : rubber ; 9 x 1.5 x 18 cm.

Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Airways.
Subject: Insufflation – instrumentation.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Anesthesia, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Magill, Ivan Whiteside, Sir, 1888-1986.

Note Type: General
Notes: Date early date, in the date range for the possible year of manufacture for
the tube described here, is based on reports that A. Charles King Ltd. helped
Magill manufacture tubes after World War II. The later year (1975) for the
possible year of manufacture is a rough estimate based on the condition of
the rubber and year that British Oxygen Company ran a rebranding campaign,
changing its name and logo. The date range could change if documentation
indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Adeney M. Smith, Sir Leslie Edward George (1919–2006). Oxford Dictionary of
National Biography website. https://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.
jsp?articleid=97324&back=&version=2010-01#. Published January, 2010. Accessed
September 18, 2013.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ball CM. The evolution of the rubber endotracheal tube. Anaesth Intensive
Care. 2014;42(4):435-436.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Bowes JB, Zorab JSM. Sir Ivan Magill’s contribution to anaesthesia. In:
Rupreht J, van Lieburg MJ, Lee JA, Erdmann W, eds. Anaesthesia: Essays on Its
History. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1982:13-17.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Drury PME. Anaesthesia in the 1920s. Br J Anaesth. 1998;80(1):96-103.
https://bja.oxfordjournals.org/content/80/1/96.full.pdf. Accessed February 3,
2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Hagberg CA, Ghouse AA, Iannucci DG. The development of techniques for airway
management. In: Eger EI III, Saidman LJ, Westhorpe RN, eds. The Wondrous
Story of Anesthesia. New York: Springer; 2014:733-734.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. Endotracheal anaesthesia. Proc R Soc Med. December,
1928;22(2):84-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/154880/. Accessed
February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. The provision for expiration in endotracheal insufflation
anaesthesia. Lancet. 1923;202(5211):68-69.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW, Macintosh RR, Hewer CL, Nosworthy MD, McConnell WS. Lest we
forget: an historic meeting of the section of anaesthetics of Royal Society
of Medicine on 6 December 1974. Anaesthesia. 1975;30(4):476-490.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Maltby JR. Magill Forceps: Sir Ivan Whiteside Magill (1888-1986). In: Notable
Names in Anaesthesia. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press, Limited;
2002:123-125.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: McLachlan G. Sir Ivan Magill KCVO, DSc, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, FFARCS (Hon),
FFARCSI (Hon), DA, (1888-1986). Ulster Med J. 2008;77(3):146–152. https://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2604469/. Accessed January 30, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Rowbotham ES, Magill I. Anaesthetics in the plastic surgery of the face and
jaws. Proc R Soc Med. 1921;14(sect anaesth): 17-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC2152821/. Accessed February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Wilkinson DJ. A. Charles King: a unique contribution to anaesthesia. J Roy
Soc Med. 1987;80(8): 510–514.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One red rubber tube; When measured from the patient perspective, with the
tube in its natural resting state, it is approximately 8.7 cm in height; This
height is formed by the curve of the tube; The tube is approximately 1.1 cm
wide (this is the external diameter of the tube), and approximately 17.9 cm
in depth (this might also be called the length of the tube); When the tube is
measured along the cure rather than from end to end, it measures
approximately 25.4 cm deep (or in length); The rubber is in good condition
and still has some elasticity; The proximal end is beveled (or cut at an
angle), while the distal end is blunt (or cut horizontally); Manufacturer
markings on the tube include, “MAGILL ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE No. 7 NASAL CTK [new
line] A. CHARLES KING LTD [new line] MADE IN ENGLAND”; To the left of this
text the number, “370209,” is printed.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, September, 2013.

Access Key: akvx

Title: Magill nasal [endotracheal tube] / [designed by Ivan W. Magill].
Author: Magill, Ivan W. (Whiteside), 1888-1986.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Magill nasal tube.

Publisher: England : A.C. King, [between 1939 and 1975?].

Physical Descript 1 endotracheal tube : rubber ; 12 x 1.5 x 19 cm.

Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Airways.
Subject: Insufflation – instrumentation.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Anesthesia, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Magill, Ivan Whiteside, Sir, 1888-1986.

Note Type: General
Notes: Date early date, in the date range for the possible year of manufacture for
the tube described here, is based on reports that A. Charles King Ltd. helped
Magill manufacture tubes after World War II. The later year (1975) for the
possible year of manufacture is a rough estimate based on the year that
British Oxygen Company ran a rebranding campaign, changing its name and logo.
This tube has the logo that dates before 1975 (Adeney , 2010). The date range
could change if documentation indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Adeney M. Smith, Sir Leslie Edward George (1919–2006). Oxford Dictionary of
National Biography website. https://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.
jsp?articleid=97324&back=&version=2010-01#. Published January, 2010. Accessed
September 18, 2013.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ball CM. The evolution of the rubber endotracheal tube. Anaesth Intensive
Care. 2014;42(4):435-436.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Bowes JB, Zorab JSM. Sir Ivan Magill’s contribution to anaesthesia. In:
Rupreht J, van Lieburg MJ, Lee JA, Erdmann W, eds. Anaesthesia: Essays on Its
History. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1982:13-17.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Drury PME. Anaesthesia in the 1920s. Br J Anaesth. 1998;80(1):96-103.
https://bja.oxfordjournals.org/content/80/1/96.full.pdf. Accessed February 3,
2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Hagberg CA, Ghouse AA, Iannucci DG. The development of techniques for airway
management. In: Eger EI III, Saidman LJ, Westhorpe RN, eds. The Wondrous
Story of Anesthesia. New York: Springer; 2014:733-734.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. Endotracheal anaesthesia. Proc R Soc Med. December,
1928;22(2):84-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/154880/. Accessed
February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. The provision for expiration in endotracheal insufflation
anaesthesia. Lancet. 1923;202(5211):68-69.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW, Macintosh RR, Hewer CL, Nosworthy MD, McConnell WS. Lest we
forget: an historic meeting of the section of anaesthetics of Royal Society
of Medicine on 6 December 1974. Anaesthesia. 1975;30(4):476-490.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Maltby JR. Magill Forceps: Sir Ivan Whiteside Magill (1888-1986). In: Notable
Names in Anaesthesia. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press, Limited;
2002:123-125.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: McLachlan G. Sir Ivan Magill KCVO, DSc, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, FFARCS (Hon),
FFARCSI (Hon), DA, (1888-1986). Ulster Med J. 2008;77(3):146–152. https://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2604469/. Accessed January 30, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Rowbotham ES, Magill I. Anaesthetics in the plastic surgery of the face and
jaws. Proc R Soc Med. 1921;14(sect anaesth): 17-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC2152821/. Accessed February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Wilkinson DJ. A. Charles King: a unique contribution to anaesthesia. J Roy
Soc Med. 1987;80(8): 510–514.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One red rubber tube; When measured from the patient perspective, with the
tube in its natural resting state, it is approximately 10 cm in height; This
height is formed by the curve of the tube; The tube is approximately 1..1 cm
wide (this is the external diameter of the tube), and approximately 18.7 cm
in depth (this might also be called the length of the tube); When the tube is
measured along the cure rather than from end to end, it measures
approximately 32.2 cm deep (or in length); The rubber is in good condition
and still has some elasticity; The proximal end is beveled (or cut at an
angle), while the distal end is blunt (or cut horizontally); Manufacturer
markings on the tube include, “MAGILL NASAL [new line] A. C. KING [new line]
MADE IN ENGLAND”; To the left of this text is the logo for the British Oxygen
Company: “BOC” in a circle with “O” overlapping “B” and “C”; To the right of
the text with the name and manufacture information is the tube size, printed
as, “8.0 [new line] MM”, in a circle; To the right of the tube size are three
different groups of markings: “372006”, HKTS”, and “B.S. 3487”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, September, 2013.

Access Key: akvy

Title: Magill endotracheal tube No. 10 / designed by Ivan W. Magill.

Author: Magill, Ivan W. (Whiteside), 1888-1986.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Magill tube.

Publisher: England : A. Charles King Ltd., [between 1945 and 1975?].

Physical Descript 1 endotracheal tube : rubber : 10 x 1.5 x 30.5 cm.

Subject: Intubation, Intratracheal – instrumentation.
Subject: Airways.
Subject: Airway Management Equipment.
Subject: Anesthesia, Intratracheal – instrumentation.

Note Type: General
Notes: Date early date, in the date range for the possible year of manufacture for
the tube described here, is based on reports that A. Charles King Ltd. helped
Magill manufacture tubes after World War II. The end date in the range (1975)
for the possible year of manufacture is a rough estimate based on the
condition of the rubber and on the year that British Oxygen Company ran a
rebranding campaign, changing its name and logo. The date range could change
if documentation indicates that it should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Adeney M. Smith, Sir Leslie Edward George (1919–2006). Oxford Dictionary of
National Biography website. https://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.
jsp?articleid=97324&back=&version=2010-01#. Published January, 2010. Accessed
September 18, 2013.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ball CM. The evolution of the rubber endotracheal tube. Anaesth Intensive
Care. 2014;42(4):435-436.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Bowes JB, Zorab JSM. Sir Ivan Magill’s contribution to anaesthesia. In:
Rupreht J, van Lieburg MJ, Lee JA, Erdmann W, eds. Anaesthesia: Essays on Its
History. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1982:13-17.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Drury PME. Anaesthesia in the 1920s. Br J Anaesth. 1998;80(1):96-103.
https://bja.oxfordjournals.org/content/80/1/96.full.pdf. Accessed February 3,
2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Hagberg CA, Ghouse AA, Iannucci DG. The development of techniques for airway
management. In: Eger EI III, Saidman LJ, Westhorpe RN, eds. The Wondrous
Story of Anesthesia. New York: Springer; 2014:733-734.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. Endotracheal anaesthesia. Proc R Soc Med. December,
1928;22(2):84-88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/issues/154880/. Accessed
February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW. The provision for expiration in endotracheal insufflation
anaesthesia. Lancet. 1923;202(5211):68-69.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Magill IW, Macintosh RR, Hewer CL, Nosworthy MD, McConnell WS. Lest we
forget: an historic meeting of the section of anaesthetics of Royal Society
of Medicine on 6 December 1974. Anaesthesia. 1975;30(4):476-490.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Maltby JR. Magill Forceps: Sir Ivan Whiteside Magill (1888-1986). In: Notable
Names in Anaesthesia. London: Royal Society of Medicine Press, Limited;
2002:123-125.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: McLachlan G. Sir Ivan Magill KCVO, DSc, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, FFARCS (Hon),
FFARCSI (Hon), DA, (1888-1986). Ulster Med J. 2008;77(3):146–152. https://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2604469/. Accessed January 30, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Rowbotham ES, Magill I. Anaesthetics in the plastic surgery of the face and
jaws. Proc R Soc Med. 1921;14(sect anaesth): 17-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC2152821/. Accessed February 3, 2015.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Wilkinson DJ. A. Charles King: a unique contribution to anaesthesia. J Roy
Soc Med. 1987;80(8): 510–514.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One red rubber tube; When measured from the patient perspective, with the
tube in its natural resting state, it is approximately 10 cm in height; This
height is formed from the curve of the tube; The tube is approximately 1..3
cm wide (this is the external diameter of the tube), and approximately 30.5
cm in depth (this might also be called the length of the tube); When the tube
is measured along the cure rather than from end to end, it measures
approximately 37 cm deep (or in length); The rubber is in good condition and
still has some elasticity; The proximal end is beveled (or cut at an angle),
while the distal end is blunt (or cut horizontally); Manufacturer markings on
the tube include, “MAGILL ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE No. HSJ [new line] A. CHARLES
KING LTD [new line] MADE IN ENGLAND”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, September, 2013.