Moxibustion

WLMD ID: akie, akif, aktz, akig, akih
The ancient Chinese practice of moxibustion is closely associated with acupuncture. It is thought to restore balance especially for conditions associated with cold or with a stagnation of "qi", or "chi", by improving blood circulation. Moxibustion involves the burning of a thimble-sized stick or cylinder of dried moxa on or above the skin at an acupuncture point. The term 'moxa' refers to the young leaves of the plant Artemesia vulgaris, commonly called mugwort. In addition to being burned at acupuncture points, the small cylinders of moxa may be applied to the end of acupuncture needles and ignited. Rather than an intense fast burn, the moxa smolders slowly. The qixingzhen mallets shown here are used in another ancient practice that is closely related to acupuncture. It is known by several names including seven-star needle therapy, seven-star needle stimulation, and plum-blossom needle tapping. The bundle of needles is inset into the head of the mallet. This is used to repeatedly tap certain areas of the body that are associated with acupuncture points and the twelve meridians of traditional Chinese medicine. The force and speed with which the tapping is applied varies, based on the purpose and location of the therapy. It may be used for a number of conditions including headache, arthritis pain, dysmenorrhea, stomachache, insomnia, constipation, and certain skin diseases.

Catalog Record: Moxibustion

Access Key: akie
Accession No.: 2006-09-11-1 H
Title: Acupuncture moxibustion needles / China National Medicines & Health Products
I. & E. Corp.

Corporate Author: China National Medicines & Health Products Import & Export Corporation.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Box of acupuncture moxibustion needles.

Publisher: China : China National Medicines & Health Products I. & E. Corp., [1970-2006].

Physical Descript: 1 box ; paperboard : 10 x 6.5 x 2.5 cm.

Subject: Acupuncture – instrumentation.
Subject: Needles, Acupuncture.
Subject: Moxibustion – instrumentation.
Subject: Pain – therapy.

Note Type: General
Notes: The modern plastic and cardboard packaging and year the item was donated form
the basis of the range (1980-2006) for the possible year of manufacture. The
date range could change if documentation indicates the range should be
corrected.

Note Type: With
Notes: Box contains eight packages of needles; Each package contains ten acupuncture
moxibustion needles; The packages are made of clear plastic and cardboard
with printed design in shades of green and text; The packages measure
approximately 9.7 x 6.0 x .3 cm; The needles in the packages are
approximately 7.9 cm in length; Some of the marking on the packages is in
traditional Chinese calligraphy; The markings in English include,
“ACUPUNCTURE”, “MOXIBUSTION”, “NEEDLES”, “MADE IN CHINA”.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Lee MS, Choi TY, Kang JW, Lee BJ, Ernst E. Moxibustion for treating pain: a
systematic review. Am J Chin Med. 2010;38(5):829-838.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Moxibustion. In: Fundukian LJ, ed. Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine.
3rd ed. Detroit: Gale Cengage Learning; 2009:1528-1529.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One cardboard or paperboard box container for ten packets of acupuncture
moxibustion needles; The box is approximately the size of a deck of cards;
The exterior is illustrated with greenery and two cranes; Some of the
markings on the box are in traditional Chinese calligraphy; The markings in
English include, “SUPERIOR QUALITY”, “ACUPUNCTURE [new line] MOXIBUSTION [new
line] NEEDLES”, and, “MADE IN CHINA”; On the back of the box, the following
is also printed, “Exported by [new line] CHINA NATIONAL MEDICINES & HEALTH
PRODUCTS I.&E. CORP.; The following is printed or stamped onto the bottom of
the box, “Name of Commodity”, “Acupuncture & Moxibustion Needles”,
Specification”, [the stamped text is difficult to read], “Quantity”, “100”.;
A sticker with the following text has been applied to the back of the box,
‘CAUTION: “Investigational device limited by United States law to
investigational use.”‘.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: The box described here, along with one of the needle packets, was
photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch on January 14, 2013 with other objects
related to traditional Chinese medicine.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert. Donation facilitated by Darrol
Erickson, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Americans seek complementary or alternative therapies for all sorts of health
concerns, including pain, chronic illness, stress reduction, and health
maintenance. One form of traditional Chinese therapy performed in the United
States is moxibustion. The Chinese practice of moxibustion is ancient and
closely associated with acupuncture. It is thought to restore balance
especially for conditions associated with cold or with a stagnation of “qi”,
or “chi” (see (see the Acupuncture Teaching Models, aiur and aiuw, or the
Churchill Acupuncture Needles, aijr, for further information). Moxibustion
involves the burning of a thimble sized stick or cylinder of dried moxa on or
above the skin at an acupuncture point. The term ‘moxa’ refers to the young
leaves of a plant commonly called ‘mugwort.’ In addition to being burned at
acupuncture points, the small cylinders of moxa may be applied to the end of
acupuncture needles and ignited. Rather than an intense fast burn, the moxa
smolders slowly. Some patients might receive acupuncture before moxibustion
therapy. The needles contained in the box described here are of the kind that
would be used to provide both acupuncture and moxibustion therapy.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Chosen for the WLM website (noted April 2, 2013).

Access Key: akif
Accession No.:
Title: Acupuncture & moxibustion needles / exported by China National Chemicals
Import & Export Corp.

Corporate Author: China National Chemicals Import & Export Corporation.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Envelope of acupuncture and moxibustion needles.

Publisher: Shanghai : China National Chemicals Import & Export Corp., [1970-2006].

Physical Descript: 1 envelope ; paper : 15.5 x 5 cm.

Subject: Acupuncture – instrumentation.
Subject: Needles, Acupuncture.
Subject: Moxibustion – instrumentation.
Subject: Pain – therapy.

Note Type: General
Notes: The date range for the possible year of manufacture of this item is based on
the range given to the box of packets of needles in record akie. The date
range could change if documentation indicates the range should be corrected.

Note Type: With
Notes: Inside the paper envelope is a clear, sealed plastic bag containing 10
acupuncture/moxibustion needles; The needles measure approximately 11 cm in
length.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Lee MS, Choi TY, Kang JW, Lee BJ, Ernst E. Moxibustion for treating pain: a
systematic review. Am J Chin Med. 2010;38(5):829-838.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Moxibustion. In: Fundukian LJ, ed. Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine.
3rd ed. Detroit: Gale Cengage Learning; 2009:1528-1529.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One paper envelope printed with brownish-green and black ink; Illustrations
of greenery and two cranes are in white; The envelope opens at the top;
Markings are in Chinese calligraphy and some English; The text in English on
the front includes, “ACUPUNCTURE [new line] & MOXIBUSTION [new line] NEEDLES”
and “EXPORTED BY [new line] CHINA NATIONAL CHEMICALS IMPORT & EXPORT CORP.
[new line] SHANGHAI BRANCH”; On the back of the envelope, print in English
includes, “No. # 30”, “SIZE”, 10 PIECES”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: The needle packet described here was photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch on
January 14, 2013 with other objects related to traditional Chinese medicine.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert. Donation facilitated by Darrol
Erickson, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Americans seek complementary or alternative therapies for all sorts of health
concerns, including pain, chronic illness, stress reduction, and health
maintenance. One form of traditional Chinese therapy performed in the United
States is moxibustion. The Chinese practice of moxibustion is ancient and
closely associated with acupuncture. It is thought to restore balance
especially for conditions associated with cold or with a stagnation of “qi”,
or “chi” (see the Acupuncture Teaching Models, aiur and aiuw, or the
Churchill Acupuncture Needles, aijr, for further information). Moxibustion
involves the burning of a thimble sized stick or cylinder of dried moxa on or
above the skin at an acupuncture point. The term ‘moxa’ refers to the young
leaves of a plant commonly called ‘mugwort.’ In addition to being burned at
acupuncture points, the small cylinders of moxa may be applied to the end of
acupuncture needles and ignited. Rather than an intense fast burn, the moxa
smolders slowly. Some patients might receive acupuncture before moxibustion
therapy. The needles contained in the envelope described here are of the kind
that would be used to provide both acupuncture and moxibustion therapy.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Chosen for the WLM website (noted April 2, 2013).

Access Key: aktz
Accession No.: 2006-09-11-1 H 2
Title: Acupuncture & moxibustion needles / exported by China National Chemicals Import & Export Corp.

Corporate Author: China National Chemicals Import & Export Corporation.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Envelope of acupuncture and moxibustion needles.

Publisher: Shanghai : China National Chemicals Import & Export Corp., [1970-2006].

Physical Descript: 1 envelope ; paper : 12 x 5 cm.

Subject: Acupuncture – instrumentation.
Subject: Needles, Acupuncture.
Subject: Moxibustion – instrumentation.
Subject: Pain – therapy.

Note Type: General
Notes: The date range for the possible year of manufacture of this item is based on
the range given to the box of packets of needles in record akie. The date
range could change if documentation indicates the range should be corrected.

Note Type: With
Notes: Inside the paper envelope is a clear, sealed plastic bag containing 10
acupuncture/moxibustion needles; The needles measure approximately 7.5 cm in
length.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Lee MS, Choi TY, Kang JW, Lee BJ, Ernst E. Moxibustion for treating pain: a
systematic review. Am J Chin Med. 2010;38(5):829-838.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Moxibustion. In: Fundukian LJ, ed. Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine.
3rd ed. Detroit: Gale Cengage Learning; 2009:1528-1529.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One paper envelope printed with brownish-green and black ink; Illustrations
of greenery and two cranes are in white; The envelope opens at the top;
Markings are in Chinese calligraphy and some English; The text in English on
the front includes, “ACUPUNCTURE [new line] & MOXIBUSTION [new line] NEEDLES”
and “EXPORTED BY [new line] CHINA NATIONAL CHEMICALS IMPORT & EXPORT CORP.
[new line] SHANGHAI BRANCH”; On the back of the envelope, the print in
English includes, “No. # 32”, “SIZE 1.5″, 10 PIECES”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: The needle packet described here was photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch on
January 14, 2013 with other objects related to traditional Chinese medicine.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert. Donation facilitated by Darrol
Erickson, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Americans seek complementary or alternative therapies for all sorts of health
concerns, including pain, chronic illness, stress reduction, and health
maintenance. One form of traditional Chinese therapy performed in the United
States is moxibustion. The Chinese practice of moxibustion is ancient and
closely associated with acupuncture. It is thought to restore balance
especially for conditions associated with cold or with a stagnation of “qi”,
or “chi” (see the Acupuncture Teaching Models, aiur and aiuw, or the
Churchill Acupuncture Needles, aijr, for further information). Moxibustion
involves the burning of a thimble sized stick or cylinder of dried moxa on or
above the skin at an acupuncture point. The term ‘moxa’ refers to the young
leaves of a plant commonly called ‘mugwort.’ In addition to being burned at
acupuncture points, the small cylinders of moxa may be applied to the end of
acupuncture needles and ignited. Rather than an intense fast burn, the moxa
smolders slowly. Some patients might receive acupuncture before moxibustion
therapy. The needles contained in the envelope described here are of the kind
that would be used to provide both acupuncture and moxibustion therapy.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Chosen for the WLM website (noted April 2, 2013).

Access Key: akig
Accession No.: 2006-09-11-1 I
Title: Pure moxa rolls for mild moxibustion / exported by China National Native
Produce & Animal By-Products Import & Export Corp.

Corporate Author: China National Native Produce & Animal By-Products Import & Export
Corporation.

Publisher: Hunan : China National Native Produce & Animal By-Products Import & Export
Corp., [1970-2006].

Physical Descript: 1 tube : paper ; 21 x 2 cm. dia.

Subject: Moxibustion – instrumentation.
Subject: Pain – therapy.

Note Type: General
Notes: Because this item was also donated by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert the date range is
based on the range given to the moxibustion needles donated at the same time
(akie). The date range could change if documentation indicates the range
should be corrected.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Lee MS, Choi TY, Kang JW, Lee BJ, Ernst E. Moxibustion for treating pain: a
systematic review. Am J Chin Med. 2010;38(5):829-838.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Moxibustion. In: Fundukian LJ, ed. Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine.
3rd ed. Detroit: Gale Cengage Learning; 2009:1528-1529.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One paper wrapped cylinder of moxa; Colors on paper include blue, white,
black and red; The tube measures approximately 21 cm in length and 1.9 cm in
diameter; Markings are in Chinese calligraphy and English; English text
printed on wrapper includes, “PURE MOXA ROLLS FOR MILD MOXIBUSTION”,
“EXPORTED BY CHINA NATIONAL NATIVE PRODUCE & ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS IMPORT &
EXPORT CORP., HUNAN BRANCH.”, “BEWARE OF MOISTURE”, “KEEP IN A DRY PLACE”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: The package described here was photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch on January
14, 2013 with three other objects related to traditional Chinese medicine.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert. Donation facilitated by Darrol
Erickson, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Americans seek complementary or alternative therapies for all sorts of health
concerns, including pain, chronic illness, stress reduction, and health
maintenance. One form of traditional Chinese therapy performed in the United
States is moxibustion. The Chinese practice of moxibustion is ancient and
closely associated with acupuncture. It is thought to restore balance
especially for conditions associated with cold or with a stagnation of “qi”,
or “chi” (see the Acupuncture Teaching Models, aiur and aiuw, or the
Churchill Acupuncture Needles, aijr, for further information). Moxibustion
involves the burning of a thimble sized stick or cylinder of dried moxa on or
above the skin at an acupuncture point. The term ‘moxa’ refers to the young
leaves of a plant commonly called ‘mugwort.’ In addition to being burned at
acupuncture points, the small cylinders of moxa may be applied to the end of
acupuncture needles and ignited. Rather than an intense fast burn, the moxa
smolders slowly. Some patients might receive acupuncture before moxibustion
therapy.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Chosen for the WLM website (noted April 2, 2013).

Access Key: akih
Accession No.:
Title: Qixingzhen.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Plum blossom needles.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Seven-star needles.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: 7 star needles.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Dermal needles.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Plum blossom hammers.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Cutaneous needles.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Skin needles.

Publisher: [S.l. : s.n., 1970-2006.]

Physical Descript: 2 dermal needle heads on hammers ; wood, stainless steel : 27 x 1.5 x 4.5 cm.

Subject: Medicine, Chinese Traditional – instrumentation.
Subject: Acupuncture Points.
Subject: Needles, Acupuncture.
Subject: Complementary Therapies – instrumentation.

Note Type: General
Notes: Because this item was also donated by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert the date range is
based on the range given to the moxibustion needles donated at the same time
(akie). The date range could change if documentation indicates the range
should be corrected.

Note Type: General
Notes: The manufacturer, place of manufacture, and a fuller title may be indicated
on the accompanying container (box) in Chinese characters; At the time this
record was created a translator for the Chinese characters was unavailable.

Note Type: With
Notes: The two needle heads with hammers are stored in an accompanying paperboard
box; The box measures approximately 4.5 x 28 x 1.5 cm; The box has a label
with white, light blue and peach colors and black print; Most of the markings
are in Chinese characters; The only word printed in Roman script on the label
is Qixingzhen; Among some characters stamped onto the side of the box may be
the year “1973”.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Aung SKH, Chen WPD. Chinese plum blossom needling therapy. Clinical
Introduction to Medical Acupuncture. New York, NY: Thieme Medical Publishers;
2007:160.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Chan AS, Cheung MC, Sze SL, Leung WW. Seven-star needle stimulation improves
language and social interaction of children with autistic spectrum disorders.
Am J Chin Med. 2009;37(3):495-504.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Liu Z. Plum blossom needle. Techniques of acupuncture and moxibustion.
Essentials of Chinese Medicine. Vol. 3. London: Springer-Verlag; 2010:130-135

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Ping C. Acupuncture techniques. Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Beijing, China:
Science Press;1999:209-210.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: Two ‘bullet’ shaped needle heads; Each needle head has seven needles
protruding approximately 2 mm from a tapered end; The end opposite the
tapered end is threaded to screw into one end of a hammer or mallet; The
needle heads are pained black, as are the parts of the hammers that hold the
needle heads; Each hammer has a long wooden stem (approximately 25.8 cm in
length); The stem is cylindrical (approximately 4 mm in diameter) at the end
attached to the needle head, and flattened out on the other end to act as a
handle; The stems are stained a reddish color.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: The needle heads with hammers described here were photographed by Mr. Steve
Donisch on January 14, 2013 with other objects related to traditional Chinese
medicine.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by Mrs. Dwyer D. Albert. Donation facilitated by Darrol
Erickson, MD.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Another ancient Chinese practice closely related to acupuncture is referred
to by a number of names including seven-star needle therapy, seven-star
needle stimulation (or knocking or hammering), and plum-blossom needle
tapping. This traditional Chinese therapy may be used for a number of
conditions including headache, arthritis pain, dysmenorrhea, stomachache,
insomnia, constipation, and certain skin diseases.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Seven-star needle therapy involves the use of a Qixingzhen (a seven-star
needle) which consists of a bundle of seven short needles inset onto one end
of the head of a hammer or mallet. The needles usually extend approximately 4
or 5 mm from the head. They may also be referred to as dermal needles, or
cutaneous needles, or, if there are five rather than seven needles, plum
blossom needles. The terms ‘7 star hammer’ or ‘plum blossom hammer’ are also
commonly used. Modern needle heads are disposable. When attached to a hammer
they are used to repeatedly tap certain areas of the body that are associated
with acupuncture points and the twelve meridians of traditional Chinese
medicine. The force and speed with which the tapping is applied varies based
on the purpose and location of the therapy.

Note Type: Publication
Notes: Zhong yi yan jiu yuan; Guang’anmen yi yuan; Zhen jiu ke. Mei hua zhen shi.
“Plum Blossom” Needle Therapy. [Hong Kong]: Medicine & Health Pub. Co.; 1976.

Note Type: Publication
Notes: Zhuang Y. The historical development of acupuncture. Los Angeles, Calif.:
Oriental Healing Arts Institute; 1982.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Chosen for the WLM website (noted April 2, 2013).