N.A.D. AM III

WLMD ID: aqst
Shown here is NAD’s third clinical machine, introduced in 1977, following the Narkomed and Narkomed Compact. The AM III was the first of NAD’s machines to centralize patient information. Electronic components such as patient monitors and alarms were directly incorporated into the machine. Features include a main switch which actuates all oxygen supply failure devices and alarm functions, centralized patient alarm panel, and centralized patient monitors and terminal block with keyed inputs for patient vitals such as blood pressure and patient O2. It utilized a 6-volt battery pack to power the electronic components. It also employed the Series 19 Vaporizer and the Vaporizer Exclusion System, which eliminated the possibility of delivering two agents simultaneously. The design of the pneumatic circuit was also improved from the previous NAD machines.

 

Catalog Record: N.A.D. AM III NAD AM III

Access Key: aqst

Accession No.: 2012-01-09-1

Title: North American Dräger AM III / North American Dräger.

Corporate Author: North American Dräger.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Anesthesia machine #3

Publisher: Telford, PA : North American Draeger, [between 1977 and ?]

Physical Description: 1 anesthesia machine : metals, plastic, glass ; 149 x 102 x 89 cm.

Subject: Enflurane.
Subject: Anesthesia Machines.
Subject: Anesthesia, Inhalation – instrumentation.
Subject: Vaporizers.
Subject: Ventilators, Mechanical.
Subject: Monitoring, Intraoperative – instrumentation.
Subject: Halothane.
Subject: Patient Safety.

Note Type: General
Notes: The early year in the date range for the possible year of manufacture is an estimate based on the earliest publication in which the machine was found to be mentioned in as well as company literature.

Note Type: With
Notes: Vapor 19 Halothane and Vapor 19 Enflurane vaporizers, descending bellows ventilator, Draeger Volumeter (Model R-ABSOR, Ser. No: R-4548), and reconditioned CO2 absorber.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: North American Dräger Company File. Archives. Located at: Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, 1061 American Lane, Schaumburg, Illinois.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: North American Dräger. North American Dräger AM III [marketing booklet]. Telford, Pennsylvania: North American Dräger; 1977.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One anesthesia machine; Blue and black metal cabinet, with 4 drawers and stainless-steel tabletop, mounted on four wheels; The front side of the tabletop holds, from left to right, an oxygen flush button and a black metal handle; The back of the tabletop holds one yoke for air and one yoke for oxygen, both with a spacer attached by a chain; The right side of the tabletop holds one yoke for nitrogen with a spacer attached by a chain;

The left rear section of the tabletop is occupied by a flowmeter bank and other components; A control panel of warning lights and indicators are on the far left side of this bank and includes, from top to bottom: “Alarm On/Off” Toggle Switch, “Ventilation Pressure” Indicator Light, “O2 Supply Pressure” Indicator Light, “Patient O2” Indicator Light, “Left Hand Vaporizer” Indicator Light, “Right Hand Vaporizer” Indicator Light; To the right of this panel is the flowmeter bank which holds one pair of tubes each for nitrous oxide, air, and oxygen; Each pair of tubes is linked to two gauges, one for the associated cylinders and one for the associated pipeline; Each pair of tubes has one control knob; To the left and towards the back of the flowmeter bank are three connections for supplied gases marked for nitrous oxide, air, and oxygen;

Above the flowmeter bank and taking up the width of the tabletop are two banks of controls and monitors, one above the other; The top bank contains five panels: “Patient O2” “Oxygen Monitor Polarographic System” with gauge and two dials, “Blood Pressure” Gauge, “Min. Ventilation Pressure Alarm Setting” Dial (3, 12.5, 25 in CM H2O),” Leak Test” Indicator Light, “Battery Test” Indicator Light, “Main Switch” Dial (On, Off, Battery Test, Leak Test), “O2 Supply” Indicator, and the last panel has printed operating instructions;

The second bank of controls is below the first; This set of controls are for the ventilator which is attached to the left; Controls include: a Dial (On, Off, On 1/3 BPM), BPM Gauge, “Frequency” Dial, and “Flow” Gauge; “NORTH AMERICA DRAGER” is marked on the far right of this bank; The ventilator holds an ascending bellows, and is marked “Pre-Set Tidal Volume Millimeters” with tidal volumes from 250 to 1700;

Below the ventilator control bank and to the right of the flowmeter bank holds two vaporizers with a selector handle, Halothane Vaporizer Vapor 19 and Enflurane Vaporizer Vapor 19;

Attached at the front left corner on a swiveling bracket is a double-canister carbon dioxide absorber, Drager Volumeter (Model R-ABSOR, Ser. No.: R-4548), and breathing bag;

A sticker on the left rear leg of the machine reads: “NORTH AMERICAN DRÄGER [new line] 148 B QUARRY ROAD [new line] TELFORD, PA 18969 USA” [new line] MODEL: AM III [new line] SERIAL NO. 3168″.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: North American Dräger (NAD) was founded in 1968 by engineer Peter J. Schreiber and two partners in rural Telford, Pennsylvania, with financial backing from the West German company, Dräger. Before immigrating to the U.S. in 1966, Schreiber designed anesthesia equipment for Dräger. The first products made by NAD were veterinary anesthesia machines; the company also sold equipment made by Dräger. In 1972 NAD introduced the first of its own line of anesthesia machines for human patients, the Narkomed Anesthesia System (later called the Narkomed 1.) These machines incorporated Dräger components.

This is NAD’s third clinical machine, introduced in 1977, following the Narkomed and Narkomed Compact. NAD was the first manufacturer to recognize the importance of a machine with centralized patient information. The AM III was designed with patient safety in mind. The machine is historically important for incorporating key electronic components such as patient monitors and alarms into the anesthesia machine, greatly advancing patient safety.

Features include a main switch, centralized patient alarm panel, and centralized sensor terminal panel. It utilized a 6-volt battery pack to power the electronic components. It also employed the Series 19 Vaporizer and the Vaporizer Exclusion System, which eliminated the possibility of delivering two agents simultaneously. The design of the pneumatic circuit was also improved to enhance patient safety.

The AM III is an example of Mr. Shrieber’s and NAD’s dedication to patient safety and the advancement of anesthesia machine design. Subsequent machines, such as the Narkomed 2, incorporated the safety innovations of the AM III.

This is NAD’s third clinical machine, introduced in 1977, following the Narkomed and Narkomed Compact. NAD was the first manufacturer to recognize the importance of a machine with centralized patient information. The AM III was designed with patient safety in mind. The machine is historically important for incorporating key electronic components such as patient monitors and alarms into the anesthesia machine, greatly advancing patient safety.

Features include a main switch, centralized patient alarm panel, and centralized sensor terminal panel. It utilized a 6-volt battery pack to power the electronic components. It also employed the Series 19 Vaporizer and the Vaporizer Exclusion System, which eliminated the possibility of delivering two agents simultaneously. The design of the pneumatic circuit was also improved to enhance patient safety.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, January 17, 2018.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Probably acquired from NAD in the 1990s.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Selected for the WLM website.