Sanford Inhaler

WLMD ID: akdt
In 1922, Dr. Charles H. Sanford (1881-1947) an anesthesiologist who practiced in New York City, was the president of the New York Society of Anesthetists. That same year he introduced his inhaler. It was manufactured by The Foregger Company and was intended to allow for the administration of more than one anesthetic with a choice of methods via a single inhaler. In addition to the inhaler Dr. Sanford designed nasal tubes and a mouth hook for the administration of anesthetics and an orthopedic operating table. The New York Society of Anesthetists was originally founded as the Long Island Society of Anesthetists in 1905 and eventually became the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). The ASA is a leading association of physicians established to uphold and advance the standards of the practice of anesthesiology and improve patient care through education, research and advocacy.

Catalog Record: Sanford Inhaler

Access Key: akdt
Accession No.: 87

Title: Sanford inhaler / [designed by Charles H. Sanford].

Author: Sanford, Charles H. (Henry), 1881-1947.
Corporate Author:

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Universal anesthesia inhaler.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: Sanford universal inhaler.

Publisher: [New York] : Foregger, [1922-1930].

Physical Descript: 1 inhaler : metals, glass ; 12 x 10 x 28 cm.

Subject: Inhalers, Anesthesia.
Subject: Anesthesia, Inhalation.
Subject: Ether, Ethyl.
Subject: Nitrous Oxide.
Subject: Ethyl Chloride.
Subject: Chloroform.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Sanford CH. A universal anesthesia inhaler. Am J Surg. April,
1922;36(4)(suppl):37-40.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: 1 metal inhaler with a glass receptacle for liquid anesthetic; The proximal
end of the inhaler is composed of a oronasal mask; The proximal end of the
mask is anatomically shaped to cover the nose and mouth; Inside the mask, at
the distal end, is a perforated metal sheet separating the compartment where
gauze for absorbing liquid anesthetic is held; “SANFORD INHALER” is marked on
the chin end of the exterior of the mask; Just distal to the mask is a ball
and socket joint that is now frozen but once rotated to allow the inhaler to
bend and adjust to various patient positions; Beyond the joint. an opening,
covered by a simple basket made of two wires, protrudes from a tubular
portion of the inhaler; This opening is the connection for a bag; “FOREGGER”
is marked on one side of this connection; Also on the tubular portion is a
sliding valve that adjusts a circular opening to air from completely open to
closed; At the distal end of the inhaler is a receptacle, for liquid
anesthetic, made from glass and metal; “FOREGGER” is marked on the distal end
of the receptacle.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch on January 16, 2013.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: In 1922, Charles H. Sanford, an anesthesiologist that practiced in New York
City, was the president of the New York Society of Anesthetists. This same
year, in the anesthesia supplement of the American Journal of Surgery, he
published an article introducing the inhaler described here. The inhaler was
manufactured by The Foregger Company and was intended to allow for the
administration of more than one anesthetic with a choice of methods via a
single inhaler. In addition to the inhaler Dr. Sanford designed nasal tubes
and a mouth hook for the administration of anesthetics and an orthopedic
operating table.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: The New York Society of Anesthetists, of which Dr. Sanford was president, was
first founded in 1905, and eventually became the American Society of
Anesthesiologists (ASA). The ASA is a leading association of physicians
established to uphold and advance the standards of the practice of
anesthesiology and improve patient care through education, research and
advocacy.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Selected for the WLM website (noted December, 2012).