Schneiderman’s bag

WLMD ID: aqle
Schneiderman Garment Bag      

Native New Yorker Benjamin I. Schneiderman, M.D. (1914-1984) earned his medical degree from New York University College of Medicine in 1939. After an internship at the affiliated Bellevue Hospital, he stayed for an 18-month residency in anesthesiology under Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895-1960). In July of 1942, Dr. Schneiderman joined the United States Army. Through the end of WWII, he served as a Captain in the Army Medical Corps, and was awarded the Bronze Star for heroic and meritorious service. Shortly after the war, he donated a captured German oxygen apparatus to the WLM. His Army-issue bag, shown here, was given to the WLM by his daughter, Mrs. Barbara George.

Dr. Schneiderman's postgraduate training made him better qualified than most of the anesthesiologists in the Corps. Because there were too few anesthesiologists in the armed forces at the start of U. S. involvement in the war, many physicians were pressed to take crash courses in anesthesiology. That program of three-month classes at civilian hospitals was developed by the National Research Council, with the assistance of leaders in the American Society of Anesthetists.

Catalog Record: Schneiderman’s bag Garment Bag

Access Key: aqle

Accession No.: 2017-05-02-1

Title: [Schneiderman’s garment bag] / United States Army.

Title variation: Alt Title
Title: [Schneiderman’s garment bag] / United States Army.

Publisher: [Place of manufacture not indicated] : [manufacturer not indicated], [between 1942 and 1946].

Physical Description: 1 garment bag : canvas and other textiles, metals, board, leather ; 26 x 89 x 64 cm.

Subject: World War II.

Note Type: General
Notes: The range of dates for the manufacture of the object is based on Dr. Schneidermans’ dates of service in the United States Army. The most likely date is 1942.

The dimensions given in the short physical description are those with the bag lying flat and at full length, as it should be when stored. In this orientation, the top is considered that side which has pockets, and the bottom is considered that side which has a zipper. The front is considered that panel which holds the wire bracket inside, and the back panel is featureless.

The bag can also be stored or displayed lying flat and folded in half; this is the position in which it was photographed in June, 2017. In this orientation, the front is considered that side on which the pocket is printed with the owner’s name and serial number, while the back is considered that side on which the pocket is printed only with his serial number. The front panel is that which holds the wire bracket inside, and the back panel is featureless.

If given adequate support, the bag can also be displayed folded and standing upright; that is the position in which it would have been carried by the handle. In this position, When the bag is folded and standing upright, the front panel faces down and the center panel, to which the handle is attached, faces up. The height when standing is approximately 51 centimeters; this could be greater if the handle is propped up.

When empty, the thickness of the bag (that is its height when lying flat, or its depth when standing upright) is approximately 13 centimeters. When the bag and its pockets are comfortably filled this dimension can be as much as approximately 41 centimeters; its soft-sided construction permits stuffing the bag and its pockets beyond that point.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: George B. Ben and Marja : a wartime romance. Publisher unknown, 2016.

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Benjamin I. Schneiderman Biographical File. Archives. Located at: Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, IL.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: One garment bag; The measurements given in the short physical description are those for the bag laid flat and full length; The exterior of the bag is made of olive-colored canvas; The interior is linked with a black fabric; The top side of the bag has three sections; The upper section has a pocket marked: “BENJAMIN I. SCHNEIDERMAN [new line] CAPT. M.C. 0-381209”; The middle section has a leather handle with metal fittings; The lower section has a pocket marked: “0-381209”; Below this pocket there is a cloth loop sewn to the bag; This loop holds a woven textile strap; The bottom side of the bag has two metal zippers that meet in the center, forming a parabola; The tongue is missing from one zipper; The tongue of the other zipper holds two metal rings; Inside the front panel of the bag there is a metal wire bracket that can hold several clothes hangers; The back panel of the bag is reinforced with a stiff board inside the lining; This panel has no exterior features; The cloth is much soiled and worn, with some tears.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. Steve Donisch, June 19, 2017.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Gift of Mrs. Barbara George, daughter of Dr. Schneiderman.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: Native New Yorker Benjamin I. Schneiderman, M.D. (1914-1984) earned his medical degree from New York University College of Medicine (NYU) in 1939. The following year, he had his internship at the affiliated Bellevue Hospital. From January, 1941 to June, 1942, he had his residency in anesthesiology at Bellevue under Emery A. Rovenstine, M.D. (1895-1960). Dr. Rovenstine was a member of the prestigious “Aqualumi” who had trained under Ralph M. Waters, M.D. (1883-1980), and was the founder of the Department at Anesthesiology at NYU.

In July, 1942, Dr. Schneiderman joined the United States Army. Through the end of WWII, he served as a Captain in the Army Medical Corps, and was awarded the Bronze Star for heroic and meritorious service. Shortly after the war, he donated a captured German oxygen apparatus to the WLM. His well-worn Army garment bag was given to the WLM by his daughter, Mrs. Barbara George.

Dr. Schneiderman’s postgraduate training made him better qualified than most of the anesthesiologists in the Medical Corps. Because there were too few anesthesiologists in the armed forces at the start of U. S. involvement in the war, many physicians were pressed to take crash courses in anesthesiology. That program of three-month classes at civilian hospitals was developed by the National Research Council, with the assistance of leaders in the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Note Type: Exhibition
Notes: Selected for the WLM website.