Sudeck Inhaler

WLMD ID: aiko
German surgeon Paul Sudeck (1866-1945) designed this inhaler to deliver ether anesthesia but deemed it useful for chloroform as well. He described the original version of the inhaler in a 1903 article titled, Eine neue Aethermaske (A New Ether Mask). For minor and short procedures Sudeck often used the inhaler to deliver light anesthesia, or analgesia, where the patient was sedated but conscious and reported no pain. To anesthetize the patient with this inhaler an absorbent material, such as gauze or a sponge, was placed inside the opening at one end, and anesthetic was applied in drops or lightly poured onto the absorbent material in amounts sufficient to achieve the desired level of anesthesia. The mask shaped end was placed over the patient’s nose and mouth, so that the patient could inhale the anesthetic vapors from within the inhaler. This Sudeck Inhaler was donated in honor of WLM Collections Supervisor Judith A. Robins, MA by WLM Honorary Curator George Bause, MD.

Catalog Record: Sudeck Inhaler

Access Key: aiko
Accession No.: 2000-10-17-1

Title: [Sudeck inhaler / designed by Paul Sudeck.]

Author: Sudeck, Paul Hermann Martin, 1866-1945.

Publisher: London : Allen & Hanburys, [190-].

Physical Description: 1 inhaler : nickel plated brass ; 10 x 10 x 7 cm.

Subject: Inhalers, Anesthesia.
Subject: Nonrebreathing Valves.
Subject: Masks, Anesthesia.
Subject: Anesthesia, Inhalation.

Note Type: General
Notes: Title from the Wood Library Museumís name for the apparatus, and confirmed by
Howat (1989).

Note Type: Citation
Notes: Howat DDC. Paul Sudeck: his contribution to anaesthesia. Anaesthesia.
1989;44(10):847-850.

Note Type: Physical Description
Notes: Nickel-plated brass inhaler, includes a molded oronasal mask; From a
patientís perspective, the distal end of the mask narrows to meet a smaller,
cylindrical sponge (or gauze) compartment; The end of the sponge compartment
is slightly rounded, with a sizable opening that extends from the side of the
compartment to a portion of its distal end; Between the mask and the sponge
compartment is a 1-way inspiratory valve with a mica diaphragm; A similar
expiratory valve protrudes from the side of the mask; Mask is marked: “Allen
& Hanburys ñ London”.

Note Type: Reproduction
Notes: Photographed by Mr. William Lyle July 13, 2010.

Note Type: Acquisition
Notes: Donated to the WLM by George S. Bause, M.D. in honor of Ms. Judith Robins.

Note Type: Historical
Notes: German surgeon Paul Sudeck (1866-1945) designed this inhaler to deliver ether
anesthesia but deemed it useful for chloroform as well. He described the
original version of the inhaler in a 1903 article titled, ìEine neue
Aethermaske.î For minor and short procedures Sudeck often used the inhaler
to deliver light anesthesia, or analgesia, where the patient was sedated but
conscious and reports no pain. (Howat, 1989.)

Note Type: Publication
Notes: Hirsch M. Der ƒtherrausch: Eine Darstellung Seiner Grundlagen und Seiner
Anwendungsweise. Leipzig: Franz Deuticke, 1907.

Note Type: Publication
Notes: Sudeck P. Eine neue Aethermaske. Deutsche medizinische Wochenschrift.
1903;29:384-385.